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Full text of "Electric lifts [Heywood Co.]"

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CCA 



1NTFRN ATIONAI 



PUBLICATION No. 13 



WORKS 

elephone No. 48 Hearon Moor, 



REDDISH 

r etegrams : Cranes. Reddish.' 



near STOCKPORT 

Code: A. B.C. i.5rh Edition). Marconi. 







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MANCHESTER 



BRANCH OFFICES 



S. H. HEYWOOD 6- CO.. Lid . Short Street. 
Telephone: City 2518. 

GLASCOW-S. H. HEYWOOD 6 CO.. Ltd. 50. Wellington Street. (Mr. Wilson Feather.) 

Telephone No. 443 Central. Telegrams: "Tools, Glasgow." 

NEWCASTLE'ON^TYNE— S. H. HEYWOOD &- CO.. Ltd.. Milburn House. (Mr. W. Spence Haswell.) 

Telephone No. 4421 Central. 

SWANSEA— S. H. HEYWOOD 6- CO.. Ltd.. II. Cambnan Place. (Mr. W. Atkinson' 

Telephone No. 563 Central. Telegrams: "Magnet. Swansea." 

Also m SYDNEY. MELBOURNE and NEW SOUTH WALES. 



LONDON— S. H HEYWOOD £r CO . Ltd. Queen Anne's Chambers. Westminster. S.W.I. (Mr. A. Ingram 

Telephone No. 505 Victoria. Telegrams: Ingramillo. Vic. London." 



Tillotsons (Bolton' Ltd.. Art Printers Bolton and London. 



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Latest Addition to our Reddish Works 




[One of two new erecting bays, each 185-ft. long and 60-ft. wide. Completed in 1920. 
The illustration shows one of our 10-ton Standard "Dust Proof" Cranes. 



LIFT 






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INTRODUCTORY 

ROSPECTIVE clients who are not already acquainted with 
the name and reputation of the firm of S. H. Heywood & 
Co., Ltd., naturally wish to be assured that we are right 
and proper persons to be entrusted with their orders for 
Electric Lifts. 

They rightly wish to be convinced that our lifts embody the 
latest practice in this branch of engineering, that they run efficiently 
and economically, and that they are thoroughly reliable in the 
fullest meaning of the word. It is to this rapidly-decreasing section 
of the public that we respectfully address the following remarks. 

For many years our name has been identified with the manu- 
facture of electrically-driven machinery of the highest class. 

In arsenals, dockyards, and foundries ; in steelworks, locomotive 
shops, and works of every description our heavy overhead cranes, 
traversers, and lifts may be seen busily at work in all parts of the 
country, saving labour and speeding-up output. 

The Admiralty, War Office, and the leading Railway Companies 
are among our clients, and hundreds of the largest and most successful 
firms in this country show their appreciation of our services by their 
repeat orders. A separate department devotes its entire energies 
to the design and manufacture of our electric lifts, and the same 
high-class design and sound engineering construction that has 
made our name famous is embodied in our electric lifts. 

The materials used are the best of their respective kinds, and we 
employ only highly skilled workmen, the majority of whom have 
served their apprenticeship in our own Works. 

Electrically our lifts are exceptionally good. 

For over thirty years we have been pioneers in the manufacture 
of electrical control gear of an exceedingly simple design and sturdy 
construction. 

No higher standard is possible in any class of machinery. 

In first cost our lifts will be found extremely reasonable and the 
expenses of upkeep practically a negligible quantity. 



























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Electric Lifts 



The controversy as to the best form in which power should be 
applied to lifts of the type under consideration was practically settled 
about fifteen years ago, and it was settled in favour of the electric 

drive. 

In some cotton factories and other works the belt-driven lift is 
still employed. The deciding factors in these cases being the low cost 
at which power could be obtained from adjacent shafting, and a certain 
saving in the initial cost of the installation. 

This method of drive has nothing else to recommend it. 

The hydraulic lift is at its best when used for short travels. 

It effects no saving in running costs, and the bills for repairs and 
maintenance are usually very high. 

Although the first cost is admittedly higher, the High-Speed 
Electric Lift is superseding all others on the grounds of its 
enormous saving of time, its safety in operation and its reliability 
when properly designed and built. Few labour-saving appliances 
pay a heavier dividend on invested capital. As far as the cost of repairs 
is concerned we will confine ourselves to the electric lifts of our own 
manufacture, and of these we can say from actual experience that 
the repairs bill is very much lower than that with any other 

form of drive. 

Busily employed and heavily worked electric lifts, installed by 
ourselves,' have run for five and six years without any attention beyond 
occasional oiling and cleaning and were then, to all appearance, 
good for many years 1 service without the necessity for any renewals 
or repairs. 

We are always happy to advise intending clients, and the services 
of our technical' staff in this capacity are entirely at their service. 










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Methods of Control 

" Switch in Cage" 

This is the simplest, and probably the 
most generally useful method of control ; 
the whole operation of the lift being con- 
trolled from the cage. 

It can be used for speeds up to 500-ft. 

per minute, and no difficulty need be 

experienced in stopping accurately at the 

various floor levels. 

Up to a speed of 160-ft. per minute, a single-speed cage switch is 

usually sufficient, with the advantage that a controller with the 

fewest possible number of parts can be used. 

Two, or even three-speed cage switches can be used on high lifts. 

The switch which we use for this purpose is of an exceedingly 

sturdy construction and will stand practically any amount of rough 

usage, and any conceivably possible weak point has been eliminated 

as the result of long practical experience. 

Used in conjunction with our patent controller, it is impossible 
for the cage attendant to start too suddenly or to damage the motor 
by an undue rush of current. 

The switch is fitted with a powerful and reliable automatic return 
to the "off " position, which will instantly stop the lift, should the 
attendant inadvertently release his hold of the handle. 

With this system of control, electro-mechanical locks are usually 
fitted on the doors on the various landings. 

It is only when the cage has come to rest opposite one of these 
gates that the locks permit them to be opened, and the lift cannot 
start away unless every gate be shut, or, if moving, will come at once 
to rest should any gate be opened. 









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Systems of Control 

" Push Button " : 



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An advantage of this system is that 
: no attendant is required. 

1 Three buttons as above are placed in 

the cage and similarly on every floor. The 

chief difference between the " cage switch 

and the "push button" is that with the former 

system, contact must be maintained during 

the whole of the time that the lift is moving, 

whilst with the "push button' 1 only a momentary pressure on the 

button is required, the lift continuing to move until the stop button 



limit 



bottom floor. 



down 



or "up" 



button according as the cage is at the time above or below 
him, and as soon as the cage comes level with the floor on which he is 
standing, he will stop it by pressing the " stop " button. He will 
then open the gate, step into the lift and close the gate after him in 
order to remake electrical contact. He will then move up or down 
as he may require by momentarily pressing the corresponding button. 

In cases where the lift is only serving two floors the operator 
remaining on one floor can send goods to the other floor, depending 
upon the limit switches to bring the cage to rest. 













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Systems of Control 

"Fully Automatic" 







This system is capable of many variations 
and additional refinements which, to describe 
fully, would require more space than we have 
here available. It is best to consider each case 
upon its merits, but generally cur advice is to 
cut out all unnecessary complications, and to 
make the installation as simple and straight- 
forward as possible. 

With our standard automatic lift we fit one 
push button upon each floor, and the intending passenger by 
pressing one of these buttons will bring the cage to the floor upon 
which he is standing. 

On entering the cage he will find a series of buttons, there being 
one for each floor served. 

By pushing the button corresponding to the floor upon which he 
wishes to alight, the cage moves up or down, as the case may be, until 
it automatically comes to rest at the desired floor. 

In this system, as in others, we make it impossible for the gates 
to be opened unless the cage is opposite the gateway, and equally 
impossible for the cage to be moved unless all the gates are shut. 

In another automatic system, we fix on each landing a series of 
pushes instead of in the cage. By this means the cage may be sent 
up or down from any floor to any other floor without the necessity 
for anyone to travel with it. Finally we have, in some cases, fixed a 
full series of push buttons on every floor in addition to the push 
buttons in the cage. 



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The Controller 

The controller is probably the most import am part of an electri< 

lift installation. 

Certainlj it is tin place where ninety-nine out of a hundred 
breakdowns and stoppa es occur on the average lift. 

In the earlj days of our manufacture of electric lifts we wen 

hligi ■ owing to the pressure in our electrical department, to buy 
iiir controllers on le. 

\lt hough w< tried manj makes the results were much the same 
In a sh< I time, sometimes within a fev weeks, appeared th< 
oubles ol excessi arcir burning ol contacts, sticking and had 

iiu to deformation durii work, sometimes singly and 

neti ^ in mbination. And to v surprise, wi found that 

, icen in g- neral of this t oi apparatus considered that such 

perieni s i * natural portion ol um is ol electrical control 

gear. 

\\ , j, ided tt design and mak< our own lift control ti md \s< 
ith i axiom that unl • pp uush bsoluteh sound 

i all} il wld n I be sound electrU all} 

V .11,;, Aiklt sth X of hi ass strip, flat phosphor- 

s P m .r cat i ; cm and maintaining contact 

sparking tips and thi wal in rewi all so d n to tin l art 

■ ! the eui • t It ctrieian 

uid perhaps i >i iportanf ill, wt - took the v.>m< shut unusual 
view that ri I • I and I >n Lift Inu-orkn en r< important 



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W « lade i first lift .ntrol o\« i - n ai s ago. and ah ' M* 1 ' 

v thu working m all parts of th< \tr) we have noi 

vet supplied a single replace part. 



CRANES 






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A Controller with a Record 




Two of these controllers have been operating two 30-cwt* Goods Lifts at one 

of the Co-operative Wholesale Society's warehouses, averaging 

100 tons per day per lift for the last six years. 

Not a single contact or any other part has been replaced, and they are, to 

all appearance, good for another ten years 1 unremitting service. 




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The Controller— continu 

We shall be pleased to show to prospective clients controllers on 
heavily-worked lifts in bus> factories that have been in daily use foe 
over six \ears that, be>ond an occasional wiping down, have not cost 
a penm piece in maintenance. 

Thi may have lost some oi their pristine brightness and polish 
but in on 1 , othei respect the\ are as good as on the das when thej 

were fii put to work. 

Space is not available to describe in detail the methods by which 
\\ c obtained these results, but one important factor is th< bl ; mg 

i all circuits on a single specially-designed switch, and upon this 
switch w< bring to bear simultan isly four devices i Ktinguishing 
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The t ntroller is mounted upon a hea\ slate Ol marble pain I. 

All Otl insulation is solid mica 

lu main rrent-carrying com t s are copper and carbo and 

p dc e\cc| all) lar« ontacf B i s 

rhe actual contax are self-adjusting and cannot decrease in 

work mg. 

Thi ■ n< i pi vided with a lar mar n of t s'pull. 

pa i is ea 1> ace Bible for cleaning or justment. 

I he mot iv start 1 with a hea\> S< nCS I Stand which is 

automatically cut <>ut as the lift acc<i 
\ r th< m i stopped, U cannot u started aga ■ I 

i< s istanci has i I n insert I. 

Ml m<>\ its of tl (mi i are al ol interlo I 



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s provided ar- so li! ill rat 1 thai it is im- 



possible t heat th »r I n th n out 



I hi dfl I I I cannot leak 






TRANSPORTERS 


























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Safeguards against Overtravel 














































In addition to the limit switches 
which cut off the current from the con- 
trol circuit when the cage reaches 
either the top or bottom floor, we fit 
on every installation a special series 
limit switch which cuts off the current 
from the whole of the plant. 

Emergency apparatus" such as this seldom or never comes into 
operation, and most designers seem to rely upon this fact in getting 
out their designs. The result is that the average emergency device 
is cut down to dangerous limits in its vital parts. 

Our series current limit switches, are, like all our other electrical 
apparatus, designed upon such lines that they are capable of daily 
and continuous use without any possibility of their deterioration. 

It is only by this means that they 
mav be absolutelv relied upon to act in 
an unexpected emergency. 

The switch acts by gravity, which 
we are justified in regarding as a more 
reliable and constant force than that 
supplied by the release of a spring. 
The illustrations render unnecessary any 
verbal description of the power and 
capacity of these switches. 













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The Winding Engine 

We wish to draw special attention to our winding engines. 

We have always regarded the average lift-makers 1 designs as being 
too light and flimsy, and our opinion has been reinforced by the 
frequent accidents which occur in the shape of broken shafts and 
other breakdowns. 

Our winding engines are designed and built on the heaviest traction 
and haulage lines. 

The wheel shafts, usually supported upon three bearings, are made 
strong enough to support the full load, should the effective support 
be reduced to that of only two bearings through the sinking of the 
building or through other causes. 

The main casting, which is extended to take the motor, is excep- 
tionally strong and rigid, and where an outside bearing is used it is 
made adjustable. The gear wheel is of phosphor-bronze with a heavy 
cast-iron centre. The worm and worm shaft are turned and cut 
from a single high carbon steel forging. 

We place the worm shaft above the worm wheel, and we do so 
advisedly : In this position more perfect lubrication can be assured 
since the worm wheel dips several inches into the oil bath, and both 
worm and wheel are readily accessible for inspection ; we avoid the 
trouble from stuffing boxes and glands on the worm shaft with their 
alternative troubles of additional unnecessary friction or constant 
oil leakage. 

Further, contrary to the general practice, the worm shaft bearings 
are split and adjustable for wear. 

All bearings are lined with heavy gun-metal bushes. 

The end pressure of the worm is taken upon a double-thrust 
adjustable ball bearing of the latest type. 













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No. 2 Size Standard Winding Engine 







This illustration gives an excellent impression of th lepth oi the bedplate and the 

general sturdiness of our designs. These Winding Engines are busilj at 

work in all parts of the country with satisfaction to our clients 

anJ with credit to ourselves. 








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Our No. 2 Size Winding Engine with Controller 





















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N e the heavy rolled steel joist placed as a reinforcement under the channtU 

supporting the Winding Engine. 
This reinforcing joist is built into the wall at both ends with the object of 
presei\ing absolute alignment of the engine bearings under widely 

varying Loads. This is our standard arrangement. 


















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Our No. 3 Size Winding Engine 



















This illustration is an actual reproduction of one of the two Winding Engines 
supplied by us in connection with two 3-ton Cupola Lifts which we 

installed in one of the world's largest steel works. 






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Brakes 

There are several distinctive points about our brakes that are well 
worthy of attention. 

They are the result of an exceptionally wide experience with 
brakes on all classes of electrically-operated machinery, and are 
uniform in design with the brakes which we use on our heavy over- 
head travellers up to 100 tons capacity. 

There is absolutely no chattering in use, a qualification which is 
materially assisted by bringing the brake arm fulcrums close together, 
and by embracing a large proportion of the circumference of the 

brake drum. 

The braking stresses are purely torsional, and thus put no 
additional load on the worm shaft bearings. 

The brake arms are lined with " Ferodo " held in position by 
countersunk-headed brass bolts. 

The springs are in compression, and will continue to do their 
work even if broken in several places. 

The solenoid has a large margin of pull. 

The plunger is designed to give a dash-pot action, and is thus 
perfectly silent in action. Further than this, it has a stroke of over 
two inches through which it will exert its rated "pull. 1 ' 

This is a marked improvement over the usual brake as applied to 
lifts, with its plunger stroke of about one-half inch, and which needs 
constant adjustment to compensate for the wear of the brake lining. 

With regard to the strength and rigidity of its parts, it is only 
necessarv to refer the reader to the illustration on the opposite page. 



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Brake on our No. 2 Winding Engine 




This brake not only gives instant response to the operations of the controller, 
but will immediately stop the winding engine and hold the 
cage on failure of the current from any cause whatsoever. 



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Standard 1-Ton Goods Cage 

























jilt of hi roll* el* ru boll t hci 

L ed with i shed t.ngucd and grooved pitch-pine boards, 

1 lower por <n ol tin sid s pro I with planished iteel-platea« 

1 he floor ' .1 with n «rds. 

Aver tial job with pr unlimited capacil for resist ng hard * if 





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A Typical Passenger Cage, constructed of 

Ornamental Wrought- Iron Work 
































We are in a position to offer to our clients a wide variety of designs for passenger 

cages. Some are made of polished mahogany or teak, and richly 
upholstered, others are of rare woods, elaborately carved. 






















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The Safety Gear 



As the safety of life or limb may depend upon the reliability in 
action of the safety gear, first cost is quite a secondary consideration. 

After studying practically every design of safety gear for lifts, 
made in this country or America, we did not consider any of them 
quite up to the standard of our other manufactures either in their 
design or in the record of their subsequent performances. 

We were again compelled to get out original designs of our own. 

The toothed grips are wedge-shaped, and are carried in massive 
steel castings which in turn are bolted to the suspension channels 
of the cage. They are also rigidly attached to the bottom of the 
cage by means of four steel tension members. 

Any undue stretching or breakage of a single rope will instanth 
bring the safety gear into action. 

The two grips are independent of each other in action, but are 
simultaneously shot into the wood guides. We thus avoid a common 
trouble when both grips at opposite guides are fastened to the sam 
shaft. While in the latter case both grips will move only through the 
same distance, a greater movement may be required of one grip than 
the other. 

In our design both grips come against the guides simultaneously 
whatever be the required movement in either case. 

The safetx gear ma\ be tested and put into action by the attendant 

without am necessitj for leaving the cage. In the same way the 
afet\ gear ma> be released and res< the grips being released by 
allowing the cage to travel upwards through a few inches. 

This safetj gear has been tried out in actual work under every 

c iceivable condition and has never failed. 

Our afet\ gear is equally adapted for use on wood or steel guides 






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Standard Safety Gear for use with Wood Guides 





The upper illustration shows the safety gear set out of action. The lower shows 
the gear with grips in action, one suspension channel being removed 

in order to show the details of the gear. 











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Wheel Drive 



It will be noted that the 



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illustrations. This is our standard arrangement, and we strongly 
recommend its use in general. 

We have eliminated the use of jockey pulleys, and make the 
driving wheels as large in diameter as possible. 

Not only does this method of drive give long life to the ropes, but 



it carries 



with it an additional safeguard against overwinding. 



Should all other safeguards fail to stop the lift, the cage or the 
balance weight, as the case may be, will come to rest upon the buffers 
at the bottom of the well hole, and the tension on the ropes being 
thus relieved, they will simply slip round in the grooves in the driving 
wheel, should the latter continue to revolve. 

We have, however, installed the drum form of drive in special 
cases where our standard drive was impracticable of application. 



Ropes 

The lifting ropes are of specially-selected flexible plough steel, 



and 



In the case of passenger lifts the ropes have a factor of safety of 20 



to 1 when fully loaded. 



Buffers 



In every case we fix at the bottom of the well hole cast-iron buffers 
containing a powerful steel spiral spring which will gently bring the 
cage to rest should overrunning take place due to negligence on the 
part of the attendant. 



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Engine Room over two 30-cwt. Goods Lifts 
















These Lifts are at work in a large factory in the South of England. They give an 

excellent impression of our fct V " wheel drive. The controllers are of 

our own design which has set a new and higher standard 

for lift controllers in general. 




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240 Horse-Power Engine Room 




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the two Engine Rn bi \mg the tw^ I ill< ratdl onth« nppost! 

pap Th a s lding drum <»v < r I flu h corner of the cage, and the 

u • Jr n> o 120 MP mo working in parallel on a 500- U 

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Two Ton Waggon Lifts 







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An Instance of the Drum Drive 







This Winding Gear is one of a number which we have supplied to the Great 

Western Railway Co. for operating 30-cwt. Goods Lifts. 








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Two 3 -Ton Cupola Lifts 




















The Lifts were supplied and erected by us for use in a large foundry in the North 
of England. We make a speciality of Cupola Lifts and have developed 

a new system of control which is absolutely safe and 
dependable in the hands of unskilled labour. 



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30-Cwt. Goods Lift 




This Lift was supplied by us to the Great Central Railway 

Co. for use in one of their works stores. 

It has a full load capacity of 30-cwt. 









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Cupola Lift in Steel Works 



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The object of this illustration is to show the safety skids which hold the trucks in 

position. These are of a special design both mechanically and electrically. 

They operate a switch beneath the cage and unless the skids are 

resting upon the rails the cage cannot be moved. 







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Two 2-Ton Lifts in a Busy Factory 







All-steel cages with two entrances. Additional steel fire-proof doors fitted with 

double bolts and el tro-mechunical locks. 





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Particulars which should accompany Orders and 

Enquiries for Electric Lifts 






Maximum load to be lifted. 
Supply voltage. 

If alternating current, the number of phases and the periodicity 
Total height of the well hole. 
Size of well hole. 

The number of floors. 

The height from the level of the top floor to the top of the 
well hole. 

Depth of well hole below bottom floor. 

If collapsible gates are required, state number and size of 
opening. 

If possible an architect's drawing should be supplied. 
The system of control desired. 


























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[BLANK PAGE] 




CCA 



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